geeskaafrika:

Once upon a time, there was a famous Queen named Ebla Awad (Araweelo), who ruled the Somali peninsula (Somalia). When she was younger, Araweelo witnessed many wars and conflicts among Somalis. She also has seen how the council of elders made some unwise decisions. She felt that these were due…

eastflatbush:

i sell unbelievable combs.

eastflatbush:

i sell unbelievable combs.

(via occupiedmuslim)

"Stories you read when you’re the right age never quite leave you. You may forget who wrote them or what the story was called. Sometimes you’ll forget precisely what happened, but if a story touches you it will stay with you, haunting the places in your mind that you rarely ever visit."

— Neil Gaiman, M is for Magic (via occupiedmuslim)

(Source: observando, via occupiedmuslim)

gaanjibo:

One of the reasons why I have an issue with the entire idea of “Somalis were never slaves” is the question of Somali nationality and ethnicity. It’s based on such a limited definition of who is Somali and who isn’t and has huge ramifications in all sectors of Somali life, particularly political…

jessehimself:

fuckyeahginatorres:
When I became an actress I quickly realize that the world liked their latinos to look Italian. Not like me. So I wasn’t going up for Latina parts. I was going up for African American parts. […] 
Regardless of the fact that I spoke the language better and understood the culture better, those [stereotypical latina] weren’t the parts that…I could take seriously. Suddenly you have to explain why I look how I look. And then it gets complicated. And nobody wants complicated.
Gina Torres | Black Latino

jessehimself:

fuckyeahginatorres:

When I became an actress I quickly realize that the world liked their latinos to look Italian. Not like me. So I wasn’t going up for Latina parts. I was going up for African American parts. […]

Regardless of the fact that I spoke the language better and understood the culture better, those [stereotypical latina] weren’t the parts that…I could take seriously. Suddenly you have to explain why I look how I look. And then it gets complicated. And nobody wants complicated.

Gina Torres | Black Latino

(via occupiedmuslim)

I was crazy addicted to this song a few years ago. Finally found it. ^.^ One of the few new somali songs that sound modernish 

Tags: somali

sixpenceee:

As someone who wants to study the human consciousness I found this very interesting.

Scott Routley was a “vegetable”. A car accident seriously injured both sides of his brain, and for 12 years, he was completely unresponsive.

Unable to speak or track people with his eyes, it seemed that Routley was unaware of his surroundings, and doctors assumed he was lost in limbo. They were wrong.

In 2012, Professor Adrian Owen decided to run tests on comatose patients like Scott Routley. Curious if some “vegetables” were actually conscious, Owen put Routley in an fMRI and told him to imagine walking through his home. Suddenly, the brain scan showed activity. Routley not only heard Owen, he was responding.

Next, the two worked out a code. Owen asked a series of “yes or no” questions, and if the answer was “yes,” Routley thought about walking around his house. If the answer was “no,” Routley thought about playing tennis.

These different actions showed activity different parts of the brain. Owen started off with easy questions like, “Is the sky blue?” However, they changed medical science when Owen asked, “Are you in pain?” and Routley answered, “No.” It was the first time a comatose patient with serious brain damage had let doctors know about his condition.

While Scott Routley is still trapped in his body, he finally has a way to reach out to the people around him. This finding has huge implications.

SOURCE

(via somaliberryshortcake)

Somali

somaliperspective:

whether you are from Puntland, Somaliland, Jubaland, Ogadenia, Khatumo State, East, West, North or South, you are still Somali

(via xamditalk)

I think that theres something about languages that fascinates me. I love being able to look at a piece of paper and read something that’s not in English. I love it when My friends Whatsapp me in Somali or Swahilli. I love being able to write my thoughts on a white board and show it to the whole class knowing that nobody will probably understand it. I love writing meaningless things in Korean knowing that the people in my maths class think I’m a bit bonkers. I love being able to reconize the difference between Japanese and Chinese both in writing and conversation. I love knowing enough of the languages and cultures that I can identify similarities and differences. I love being able to speak in a different language whenever I feel uncomfortable and knowing my teachers probably don’t know that when I mumble I’m wishing them a slow and painful death in Arabic. ^.^ But I think what I love most is being able to express myself differently in each language.

Woops!

xmona:

Our SUV plates at our farm in BALCAD, SOMALIA // 50mm 2012

xmona:

Our SUV plates at our farm in BALCAD, SOMALIA // 50mm 2012


exo casually walking into your life like…

exo casually walking into your life like…

(Source: incandescent-boy, via dont-drop-that-nae-nae)

(Source: bbalgangyi, via kyungville)

"Haye,ii wad sheekada"

— When a Somali says this during a conversation,it’s one of two reasons:
1) They don’t believe a shit you’re saying
2) They’re enjoying whatever you’re telling them (via missanisah)