It’s definitely something you go through especially if you’ve lived in another country for a while. It’s been nearly two years since I’ve been back in the UK and their are just some things that I still miss about Nairobi. Here’s the few that I really miss at the moment.
1. Always meeting someone you know on the streets. 
Seriously this happened all the time. You would meet about 15 people you know on your way to wherever your going. Weather they be acquaintances or close friends. And the best thing about that…Wait for it…No awkwardness. There is no question about whether you should greet them or not. Once you see them you acknowledge them and ask how their doing even if you haven’t seen them for a year and can’t remember their names. It’s different here. Every time I see somebody I know but am not close to there’s always the question of whether to say hi or pretend I can’t remember them.   
2. The loudness of the days
It’s always loud in Nairobi unless you live in a secluded estate. The day begins early and even before sunrise, the kiosks are open and the guys lifting the packages (xamali’s) are running around and shouting. You look out of your window and theirs always someone doing something and there are almost always people on the street.
It’s not like that in the area I live now. It’s almost always quite unless the Neighbourhood pub decides to throw a summer party or the Dogs next door aren’t feeling well. And there only like one person who passes through an hour on the street. For someone who entertained herself for a year and a half by watching people outside the window this is really frustrating!
3. The Closeness of your neighbours
The Majority of Kenyans don’t live in houses but apartments, you have a lot of neighbours especially because the families are usually big. But the funny thing is even though I was only in Kenya for 3 years and a half and we moved 3 times, I know them more than I do the neighbours that I’ve lived next to for 11 years.
Neighbours become almost like an extension of family. We’d get together during blackouts, share water when the water stopped and more importantly help each other guard your clothes from thieves. 
These are just some of the few things that are different between the UK and Kenya. If you have anything to add why not send a submission or a reply?

It’s definitely something you go through especially if you’ve lived in another country for a while. It’s been nearly two years since I’ve been back in the UK and their are just some things that I still miss about Nairobi. Here’s the few that I really miss at the moment.

1. Always meeting someone you know on the streets.

Seriously this happened all the time. You would meet about 15 people you know on your way to wherever your going. Weather they be acquaintances or close friends. And the best thing about that…Wait for it…No awkwardness. There is no question about whether you should greet them or not. Once you see them you acknowledge them and ask how their doing even if you haven’t seen them for a year and can’t remember their names. It’s different here. Every time I see somebody I know but am not close to there’s always the question of whether to say hi or pretend I can’t remember them.   

2. The loudness of the days

It’s always loud in Nairobi unless you live in a secluded estate. The day begins early and even before sunrise, the kiosks are open and the guys lifting the packages (xamali’s) are running around and shouting. You look out of your window and theirs always someone doing something and there are almost always people on the street.

It’s not like that in the area I live now. It’s almost always quite unless the Neighbourhood pub decides to throw a summer party or the Dogs next door aren’t feeling well. And there only like one person who passes through an hour on the street. For someone who entertained herself for a year and a half by watching people outside the window this is really frustrating!

3. The Closeness of your neighbours

The Majority of Kenyans don’t live in houses but apartments, you have a lot of neighbours especially because the families are usually big. But the funny thing is even though I was only in Kenya for 3 years and a half and we moved 3 times, I know them more than I do the neighbours that I’ve lived next to for 11 years.

Neighbours become almost like an extension of family. We’d get together during blackouts, share water when the water stopped and more importantly help each other guard your clothes from thieves. 

These are just some of the few things that are different between the UK and Kenya. If you have anything to add why not send a submission or a reply?